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Yemen

In 2011 protestors in Yemen started a revolution against President Ali Abdullah Saleh. He announced he wasn't going to run for re-election but protests still went on. As the demonstrations continued there were some deaths of prisoners rioting in agreement with those against the current government. The violence continued on the streets and protestors were killed.

Al Jazeera

After President Saleh left office in 2012 fighting in some areas of Yemen subsided but conflicts in other areas persisted. There were attacks on civilians by government forces as well as rebel groups. It was a time of transition as Abdu Rabu Mansour Hadi became president, which also led to resistance, and fighting that resulted in deaths. There were also many humanitarian issues regarding the attacks during the uprising, use of children soldiers, freedom of speech, lack of sufficient food and clean water, terrorism, and women's rights.

HRW

In 2014 the conflicts in Yemen continued. The Huthi's led protests because of the government slashing fuel subsidies. They seized the capital of Yemen Sana'a and by 2015 it led to more fighting and a Saudi Arabian coalition intervened by launching air strikes against the Huthi's. Violence spiraled out of control as supporters for the former President Saleh and current President Hadi fought, killing and injuring over 12,000 civilians.

Amnesty International

Over the last few years the crisis in Yemen has continued with bombs, airstrikes, shelling, and ground fighting. By the beginning of 2017 the death toll had reached about 10,000 and the amount of injured reached 40,000. Civilians continue to be victims of violence and there is evidence of the US and UK supplying weapons to the Saudi Arabia-led coalition. In August there was a USA made bomb that killed 16 people and injured 17.

Amnesty International

With the conflict in Yemen going on the Saudi-led coalition began a blockade to shut down the country's borders. The blockade was to block weapons coming in, but it's limited access to fuel, food and medicine. In the last week of November 2017 Saudi Arabia allowed some humanitarian aid to come in, but there is still not enough clean water, food, and medicine. By the end of 2017 about 8.4 million people in Yemen were on the brink of famine, with many suffering from malnutrition.

Al Jazeera

In Yemen there has been an outbreak of cholera now reaching about 1 million cases that has killed around 2,200 people. Cholera is a waterborne bacterial disease that causes diarrhea and dehydration. Cholera is both preventable and treatable; according to Dr. Sack of John Hopkins University a patient with cholera should never die. The lack of access to clean water and medical treatment in Yemen from the war has caused the outbreak of cholera to reach such a high number. If there isn't any fuel coming into the country for the water pipes to work, the amount of cholera cases will continue to grow.

NPR

The lack of adequate medical supplies from the blockade is leading to more deaths. Pharmacies and hospitals are running out of drugs needed to treat cancer, diabetes, and renal failure. One doctor said they could lose all their cancer patients and even those with diabetes, which is a treatable disease. It's also expected that diseases such as polio and measles could be fatal, especially for children and those that are malnourished. The prices of food and fuel have also skyrocketed, making it difficult for many to survive.

Al Jazeera

The ongoing conflicts in Yemen have destroyed their economy. Since 2016 teachers, doctors, and civil servants have been going to work unpaid. It's also made it difficult for some to continue their education. The reoccurring violence has become normalized, with many holding onto fear of losing their loved ones and losing hope that others will step in to help do something about it.

PRI

With the conflict in Yemen going on schools have been attacked with children being killed or injured. It also forced about 3,600 schools to shut down and has affected the education of 1.8 million children. There has been some improvement, but there are still more than 1,600 schools closed and 387,000 children out of school. Mohammed Elfadili, the Director of General Education in Sana'a, notes the importance of school and how activities and sports can help children to temporary forget about the war.

UNICEF

After Sahar's husband died and the conflict got closer to the district where she and her six children lived, she decided to leave because it was unsafe. They left with a few belongings and found that other people fleeing the area were going to Al-Qanawis so she followed them. She and her children slept in the open for two nights with nothing to eat. They were left without any other choice but to build a home out of carton boxes, sticks, ropes, and clothes to make a hut, also known as an usha. The usha isn't safe from rain or wind, but it's the only option they have.

UNICEF

By the end of 2017 the war in Yemen killed 1,876 children and injured 2,987. The Al-Kubati family has all been affected and their lives changed all within a few seconds. Aswan injured both her legs from a mortar, her mother was wounded in the chest and also lost her left eye, and a shrapnel killed her grandfather. Aswan had to have both legs amputated from the knees and now has artificial limbs. She's been receiving treatment for her injuries and has been out of school for two years. Her father who lost his job 2015 due to the conflict struggles to take care of their family financially.

UNICEF

In December 2017 the former the Houthi killed President Ali Abdullah Saleh. They were in alliance up until the week before his death, after he announced his willingness to talk to the Saudi led coalition. The Houthi's killed Saleh with a rocket-propelled grenade and there has been graphic footage on social media of his body. The Houthi's say they killed him because he was a traitor. The violence in Yemen is now expected to worsen.

NPR